Departments

Drama

St. FX Theatre Knights

The St. FX Theatre Knights provides students the opportunity to bring shows to life on the St. FX Stage. In the process, lessons are learned, friendships are formed and audiences are entertained, educated as well as enlightened. Join us and PLAY ON!

Grade 10 Dramatic Arts

This course introduces students to the concepts of drama and theatre as well as provides foundations in tableau, movement, voice and speech as well as aspects of ritual and theatre history.

Grade 11 Dramatic Arts

Building upon the foundation laid in the Grade 10 program, this course furthers the study of drama through acting approaches, staging techniques as well as the eras of theatre history.

Grade 12 Dramatic Arts

This course continues the study of approaches to acting as well as staging scenes. Other styles of theatre such as Theatre of the Absurd are explored and staged. Students also look into and prepare for post-secondary theatrical paths.

Grade 11 Musical Theatre

This is an introduction to the theatrical style of musical theatre which uses song, dance and movement to enhance the overall storytelling quality of a show. The early days of musical theatre history are explored and applied to solo, duo and small group performances.

Grade 12 Musical Theatre

A continuation of the Grade 11 program, this course further explores the world of Musical Theatre looking at the use of adaptation, song posts and the development of character as well as developing a critical eye and informed opinion.


Music

We offer a comprehensive music program at St. FX. Students can select Instrumental Music in Grades 9, 10, 11 and 12.  Guitar and/or Vocal Music courses are offered at the grade 10, 11 and 12 levels.


Art

Grade 9 Visual Arts – AVI1O1

This course focuses on the Elements and Principles of Art. Students will also study Prehistoric, Egyptian and Canadian art history, as well as career exploration. Studio work includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, etc. The course evaluation is 70% course work, 20% culminating task and 10% final exam.

Grade 10 Visual Arts – AVI2O1

This course focuses on the Elements and Principles of Art. Students will also study Ancient Greek, Ancient Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic art history, as well as career exploration. Studio work includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, etc. The course evaluation is 70% course work, 20% culminating task and 10% final exam.

Grade 11 Visual Arts – AVI3M1

Prerequisite: AVI1O1 or AVI2O1

This course focuses on the Elements and Principles of Art. Students will also study Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Realism art history, as well as career exploration. Studio work includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, etc. The course evaluation is 70% course work, 20% culminating task and 10% final exam.

Grade 11 Photography – AWQ3M1

Prerequisite: AVI1O1 or AVI2O1

This course focuses on the history of the camera. Students will learn how use a SLR camera, Photoshop, how to apply the Elements of Art and Principles of Design to produce successful photography artwork and career exploration. The course evaluation is 70% course work, 20% culminating task and 10% final exam.

Grade 11 Craft – AWA3O1

This course focuses on traditional and non-traditional art. Students will learn how creating multimedia artworks could transform their environmental and human potential. Students will also explore career opportunities in the field of craft. The course evaluation is 70% course work and 30% culminating task.

Grade 12 Visual Arts – AVI4M1

Prerequisite: AVI3M1

This course focuses on the Elements and Principles of Art. Students will also study Impressionism, Post Impressionism, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Realism art history, as well as career exploration and portfolio preparation. Studio work includes drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, etc. The course evaluation is 70% course work, 20% culminating task and 10% final exam.

The Business Studies program at Jean Vanier provides students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to achieve success in secondary school, the workplace, post-secondary education or training, and daily life.

The Business Studies program will build a strong foundation for those who wish to move on to further study and training in specialized areas such as management, international business, marketing, accounting, information and communication technology, or entrepreneurship. It will also provide practical skills for those who wish to move directly into the workplace.

Students are motivated and learn best when they understand the relevance of what they are studying. The Business Studies program provides rich opportunities for relevant, real-world learning experiences.

The Canadian & World Studies Department offers courses and opportunities that seek to develop a greater awareness of the world and Canada’s role within it. Framed by the Catholic faith, our courses, trips and events aim to not only examine issues from a geographical, political, legal and historical perspective, but also from moral and ethical standpoints as well. Students are presented with engaging opportunities to develop their critical thinking skills in order to investigate events, both past and present, and to challenge their current understanding of the world in which we live.

The English department at Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary School offers courses and opportunities that focus on the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life.  In each of our courses we emphasize the development of listening, speaking, viewing, reading and writing skills through our exploration of a wide variety of texts.  The texts have been selected to engage and challenge our students, providing them with opportunities to explore issues that affect them as individuals and members of their local and global communities with the guidance of our teachers.  We encourage our students to recognize that the skills taught in the English class are transferrable to all other courses of study in high school and post-secondary, as well as their daily lives.

The Moderns department at Jean Vanier Catholic Secondary school offers courses and opportunities for students to experience the language and culture of Canada’s other official language as well as Italian.  Knowledge of a second language provides students with the opportunity to strengthen their first language skills, enhance their critical and creative thinking abilities and to become more knowledgeable and respectful of other cultures.  In addition, the ability to communicate in another language provides students with a distinct advantage in a number of careers, both in Canada and internationally.  The Moderns courses aim to prepare students to perform effectively in the challenging world they will face by providing them with the skills they will need to communicate in a second language.  Students are encouraged to join the “Paris Knights” French Club to engage in cultural activities that will strengthen their leadership skills, and broaden their cultural appreciation of the language.

The Jean Vanier Library and Learning Commons is open from 7:45 am to 3:45 pm, Monday to Friday unless otherwise posted. Please contact Mr. Peddle, Librarian, or Mrs. Kozak, Library Clerk, if you have any questions about resources, citation or research help, presentations, or booking the space for class use.

Books & E-books

The Learning Commons has access to a variety of books and e-books at your disposal to help you with your research. Please ask for the various user names and passwords to access them from home.
Library Catalogue – search for print books and e-books here
Gale Virtual Reference Library – collection of e-books in a variety of disciplines (includes teacher resources)
Infobase e-books – collection of e-books in a variety of disciplines

Databases

Use the databases below to find information from a variety of sources including newspapers, magazines, academic journals, books, and more.
REMEMBER – when accessing the databases from home, they are password protected! Please see library staff for the log-in information.

EBSCO
Gale
Encyclopedia Britannica Online
HCDSB Secondary Resources

Citation Guides

When you are working on an assignment, you must keep track of all your sources used. They must be listed at the end of your assignment as a Works Cited, a Reference List, or a Bibliography. You must also use citations within your assignment, as either in-text citations or footnotes or endnotes. There are different citation styles you can follow. That is up to your teacher which style you should use. Here are some guides that can help you with your formatting. Please see Mr. Peddle if you require more help.

MLA Style Guide
APA Style Guide
Chicago Manual of Style

Evaluating Sources

When using the Internet for research, there are many factors you should consider when deciding whether the website is appropriate or not.

Here are some documents with criteria for you to consider:

The 6 W’s of Website Evaluation
Is it C.R.A.P.?
Six Points to Remember

Rules of the Library and Learning Commons

• Full uniform is required
• No food or drinks (except water)
• No backpacks – leave them in your locker
• Computers are for educational purposes only. To access your computer account, please use your username; if you have trouble please see a library staff member.
• Your student card is needed to sign out library books
• No cards or other games are allowed
• Respect everyone’s right to work QUIETLY in the Library/LC
• REMINDER: If it’s not allowed in your classroom, it’s not allowed in here!

Extra Math Help at St. FX

Mathematics can sometimes be a difficult and frustrating subject for some students, but with success, it can also be very enjoyable and satisfying. Success comes with constant practice and thorough understanding of the concepts. Try to stay on top of the daily assignments and at the first sign of difficulty make arrangements for extra help.

These sessions are teacher supervised and provide an opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups to catch up on missed work, complete homework and/or prepare for tests. The supervising teacher circulates the room and is available to answer any questions. It is the student’s responsibility to raise his/her hand and ask for assistance if needed.

Remember math counts!


Online Math Help

Homework Help is a FREE online math help resource for students in Grades 7-10. Homework Help provides FREE, live one-on-one tutoring from Ontario teachers.

Homework Help is funded by the Ontario government and administered by TVO.

Students can ask their math questions during our chat room hours, Sunday- Thursday 5:30pm–9:30pm ET

Need more help? Check out our 24/7 Resources!  Click here!


Math Contests

The CEMC develops and administers many internationally recognized contests to help to inspire the next generation of students to develop an interest in and love for mathematics and computer science. Interested students should ask their math teachers about these contests.

Costs are established by the University of Waterloo.


Math Pathways

Click here for information regarding prerequisites for secondary math courses.

At St. FX, our hope is to help students discover the religious ideas expressed in our Catholic world view. Our curriculum encourages students to continue to build loving relationships and to recognize their call to live an ethical life guided by the Gospel principles of equity, dignity and respect for all of God’s creations.

Delivery of science curriculum is divided into four general disciplines, namely: biology, chemistry, earth/space sciences, and physics. In Grade 9 and 10 all four disciplines are introduced in individual units.

In Grades 11 and 12 each of these disciplines is offered separately and provides a more detailed survey of 5 distinct areas within the discipline. For example, biology would discover genetics, evolution, plants, metabolic processes, body systems. Chemistry, for example would, investigate structure of matter, reactions, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, equilibrium. Physics for example would examine forces, electricity, and magnetism.

Science is a pathway for many post- secondary programs and is for many students an interesting subject unto itself. Laboratory investigations, dissections, student projects and multimedia as well as other activities are employed in discovering the fascinating world of science

We offer various courses that explore concepts and issues in the areas of Social Sciences and Humanities. Students will gain insights on topics that concern human interactions, decision-making and behaviours from various perspectives. As they develop valuable critical thinking and research skills, students will analyze how current issues impact our 21st Century world and how Canadians are meeting the challenges of the ever-changing global environment.

Special Education

 

Students with Individual Education Plans should consider taking advantage of the following specialized Guidance and Career Education courses.

GLE1O Learning Strategies: Skills for Success in Secondary School

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become more independent learners.  Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community.  The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Program Emphasis: The year one GLE course places an emphasis on understanding how and what can be done to improve one’s learning throughout secondary school. An important goal of GLE1O is to improve self-awareness and build the self-advocacy skills needed to foster independence.

GLE2O Learning Strategies: Skills for Success in Secondary School

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become more independent learners.  Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community.  The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Program Emphasis: Year two continues to build on skills, strengths and independence goals.  A primary focus is continuing to develop critical thinking skills as these are required when students write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

GLE3O Advanced Learning Strategies: Skills for Success After Secondary School

This course improves students’ learning and personal management skills, preparing them to make successful transitions to work, training, and/or postsecondary education destinations.  Students will assess their learning abilities and use literacy, numeracy, and research skills and personal management techniques to maximize their learning.  Students will investigate trends and resources to support their postsecondary employment, training, and/or education choices and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals.

Program Emphasis: Year three GLE places an emphasis on evaluating, planning and choosing programs that will support possible pathways beyond secondary school. Self-advocacy continues to be developed with a focus on greater independences and future goals and education.  The future paths explored relate to workplace, apprenticeships, college and/or university placements.

GLE4O Advanced Learning Strategies: Skills for Success After Secondary School

This course improves students’ learning and personal management skills, preparing them to make successful transitions to work, training, and/or postsecondary education destinations.  Students will assess their learning abilities and use literacy, numeracy, and research skills and personal management techniques to maximize their learning.  Students will investigate trends and resources to support their postsecondary employment, training, and/or education choices and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals.

Program Emphasis: Year four GLE places an emphasis on applying to and choosing a post-secondary placement. Students explore financial aid, bursaries and scholarships. Students directly connect with Learning Support Centres at post-secondary institutions. Each student prepares to better meet his/her specific areas of interest that will support possible pathways beyond secondary school. The path(s) related to any of the following may be explored: workplace, apprenticeship, college, and/or university.

Saint Francis Xavier Special Education Resource Teachers:

  • Ms. L. Daly – Special Education Department Head

SERT’s:

  • Ms. Jodi Nieuwendyk (Life Skills)
  • Ms. Tracey Tapper (Life Skills)
  • Ms. Kyla Robertson (Life Skills)
  • Ms. Danielle Popic (GLE)
  • Ms. Tricia Maltby (GLE)

St. FX Educational Assistants:

  • Ms. A. Colonico
  • Ms. H. Edwards
  • Ms. M. McMahon
  • Ms. K. Mercer
  • Ms. K. Morton
  • Ms. M. O’Doherty
  • Ms. L. Olivierre
  • Ms. D. Price
  • Ms. R. Sevigny
  • Ms. M. Socha
  • Ms. L. Thissen

SEAC Soundbytes

https://www.hcdsb.org/Community/SEAC/Pages/default.aspx

What is SEAC?

As we start a new school year, the members of SEAC wanted to take a minute to let you know who we are and what we do. Did you know that there is a committee in each school board or school authority that provides important and relevant advice on Special Education?

This committee is known as the Special Education Advisory Committee or SEAC. SEAC is made up of school board trustees and representatives of local associations with a common goal of protecting the interests and well-being of exceptional children or adults.

Associations currently represented on HCDSB SEAC are:

  • Association for Bright Children (ABC) Ontario, Halton Chapter; Autism Ontario; Easter Seals Ontario;
  • Halton Down Syndrome Association; VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children

The importance of SEAC is their ability to assist the board with understanding the special needs of exceptional children and youth, and to advise the board in matters that apply to the delivery of special education services and program.

Each school board and school authority in Ontario must establish a SEAC. The meetings are open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend. HCDSB holds their SEAC meetings on the last Monday of each month at 7pm, at the Board office. We would love to see you there!

Please feel free to visit our website at www.hcdsb.org/Community/SEAC/Pages/default.aspx where you can also find more information on HCDSB SEAC including copies of minutes from previous meetings, and a listing of upcoming meetings.

Submitted by: Brenda Agnew, SEAC Chair, representing Easter Seals Ontario

The start of a new school year also means that soon classroom teachers will be working with their Special Education Resource Teachers (SERTs) to develop student Individual Education Plans (IEPs), which are usually ready for distribution to parents in the latter part of October.

Often times many of the terms used on the IEP can be confusing to parents. Terms such as Accommodations, Modifications and Alternative Programs as they relate to the Curriculum / Subjects Areas. What exactly does this mean and how does it affect the individual student?

Accommodations: When a subject is accommodated for a pupil nothing about the subject content changes. An easy way to explain this might be if you are reading a novel and you require reading glasses. Nothing about the content in your novel is changed but your reading glasses are considered an accommodation to be able to access the novel you wish to read. You require glasses as a support to see and absorb the material. Accommodations are categorized as instructional, environmental or assessment supports and are listed by category on the IEP. Accommodations that are routinely used by most teachers with the entire class are not listed. Accommodations include only those supports required by a student that differ from what is normally provided during classroom instruction. Some further examples include an alternative work space, duplicated notes, extra time, frequent breaks and reduction of tasks.

To reiterate nothing about the subject matter or level of instruction changes when a subject is accommodated only.

Modifications: When a subject is modified for a student there are aspects of the curriculum in that subject that DO change. In most cases the student may be presented with material below the grade level of their peers. In other subjects a modification can take the form of fewer learning expectations, simplified tasks or in some cases higher level activities. Because the material is being modified or changed from the regular curriculum for the student’s grade, it is necessary to record the pupil’s current level of functioning in that subject, an annual goal for the pupil, a sample selection of the learning expectations being presented, teaching strategies and assessment methods. A modified subject is one that has been changed to meet the level where the pupil can be expected to begin to progress.

Alternative: When a subject is alternative it is different curriculum from Ontario Curriculum. Samples of Alternative Curriculum include, Communication Numeracy, Communication Literacy, Daily Living and Employability Skills, Personal Care, Social Skills Training, Orientation and Mobility Training. Because this curriculum is different from regular grade curriculum, a current level of functioning, an annual goal, sample learning expectations, teaching strategies, and assessment strategies are outlined in detail in each subject area.

Some students may have IEPs with only alternative curriculum. Some pupils may only have accommodated subjects. Some students may have a combination of subjects that are modified, some that are accommodated only and some alternative subjects outlined in their IEP.

For more information, please visit https://www.hcdsb.org/Programs/SpecialEducation/SpecialEducationPlan/Pages/Individual-Education-Plans.aspx

Submitted by: Joanne Parisi, HCDSB SEAC Member at Large

Technological education provides students with useful and valuable skills. These skills provide them with the tools that our technology driven world demands. From drill bits to computer bits, students will get hands-on experience with a wide variety of technical possibilities. Safe work practices are learned in all shops and on all equipment.

Technology classes provide immediate skills and prepare our students for post-secondary paths such as trades & apprenticeship, college technology programs and university fields such as engineering. Many of our graduates have gone on to successful careers because of their technical skills.

Technology programs offered at St. Francis Xavier include:

  • Communication Technology
  • Communication Technology – Yearbook
  • Computer Engineering
  • Computer Programming
  • Construction (grade 10)
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Technological Design
  • Transportation Technology
Creative Design OfficerDepartments