Departments

Drama

Drama courses offered:

Drama, Grade 10 Open

ADA2O-This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures and representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences.

Prerequisite: None


Drama, Grade 11 University/College Preparation

ADA3M-This course requires students to create and perform in dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences.

Prerequisite: Drama, Grade 9 or 10, Open


Drama, Grade 12 University/College Preparation

ADA4M-This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other texts and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures, and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

Prerequisite: Drama, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

ADA4O-This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other texts and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures, and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

Prerequisite: None


Dance

Dance courses available:

Dance, Grade 9 Open

ATC1O-This course gives students the opportunity to explore their technical and compositional skills by applying the elements of dance and the tools of composition in a variety of performance situations. Students will generate movement through structured and unstructured improvisation, demonstrate an understanding of safe practices with regard to themselves and others in the dance environment, and identify the function and significance of dance within the global community.

Prerequisite: None


Dance, Grade 10 Open

ATC2O-This course emphasizes the development of students’ technique and creative skills relating to the elements of dance and the tools of composition in a variety of performance situations. Students will identify responsible personal and interpersonal practices related to dance processes and production, and will apply technologies and techniques throughout the process of creation to develop artistic scope in the dance arts.

Prerequisite: None


Music

Promotional Video – Follow this link :  Music/Vocals Video

Here is a list of the course we offer:

AMG 2O1 Guitar Music 10 Open

This course emphasizes performance of music at a beginner to intermediate level.  No previous musical knowledge is required.  Student learning will include open chords: major, minor, sevenths; notes on the first 5 frets; creative activities and ensemble playing. Students will also be required to develop an understanding of standard and TAB music notation, music terminology, and history. The focus of this course will be on learning pop and rock songs on the classical guitar.  The school provides the instrument for the duration of the course.


AMG 3O1 Guitar Music 11

This course develops students’ artistic knowledge and skills through the performance of music and the preparation of music productions. Students will perform appropriate works, particularly works in contemporary popular styles.  Independently and in groups, they will also plan, market, and perform, making use of appropriate technology, and will evaluate the results. The focus of this course will be on the acoustic guitar. The school provides the instrument for the duration of the course.


AMU 1O1 Music 9

This course emphasizes the performance of music at a level that strikes a balance between challenge and skill and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination.  Students will participate in creative activities that teach them to listen with understanding. They will also learn correct musical terminology and its appropriate use.  Students culminate the course with a end of semester concert.


AMU 2O1 Music 10

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures.


AMR 3M  Music Repertoire 11

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analysing live and recorded performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers. This course focuses on Music – Repertoire


AMR 4M Music Repertoire 12

This course emphasizes the appreciation, analysis, and performance of various kinds of music, including baroque and classical music, popular music, and Canadian and non-Western music. Students will perform technical exercises and appropriate repertoire, complete detailed creative activities, and analyse and evaluate live and recorded performances. They will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music while developing their technical and imaginative abilities. This course focuses on performance of the student’s chosen instrument in a large ensemble setting.


Visual/Media Arts

Visual Arts and Media Arts courses offered:

Visual Arts, Grade 9 Open

AVI1O-This course is exploratory in nature, offering an overview of visual arts as a foundation for further study. Students will become familiar with the elements and principles of design and the expressive qualities of various materials by using a range of media, processes, techniques, and styles. Students will use the creative and critical analysis processes and will interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.

Prerequisite: None


Visual Arts, Grade 10 Open

AVI2O-This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to reflect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.

Prerequisite: None


Visual Arts, Grade 11 University/College Preparation

AVI3M-This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emerging technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g., photography, video, computer graphics, information design).

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open


Visual Arts, Grade 12 University/College Preparation

AVI4M-This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation


Media Arts, Grade 10 Open

ASM2O-This course enables students to create media art works by exploring new media, emerging technologies such as digital animation, and a variety of traditional art forms such as film, photography, video, and visual arts. Students will acquire communications skills that are transferable beyond the media arts classroom and develop an understanding of responsible practices related to the creative process. Students will develop the skills necessary to create and interpret media art works.

Prerequisite: None


Media Arts, Grade 11 University/College Preparation

ASM3M-This course focuses on the development of media arts skills through the production of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as new media, computer animation, and web environments. Students will explore the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process to produce effective media art works, and critically analyze the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values.

Prerequisite: Media Arts, Grade 10, Open


Media Arts, Grade 12 University/College Preparation

ASM4M-This course emphasizes the refinement of media arts skills through the creation of a thematic body of work by applying traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as multimedia, computer animation, installation art, and performance art. Students will develop works that express their views on contemporary issues and will create portfolios suitable for use in either career or postsecondary education applications. Students will critically analyse the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and community values.

Prerequisite: Media Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation


Photography, Grade 11 University/College Preparation

AWQ3M-This introductory photography course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in the visual arts. The initial emphasis will be on the digital photographic techniques and processes. Following this the focus will be on creative applications of the photographic medium. The elements and principles of design and their importance to visual communication will be an integral component of study as they are essential to the medium of photography. Students will apply the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio projects using the digital medium. Students will also use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others.

Prerequisite: None


Photography, Grade 12 University/College Preparation

AWQ4M-This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting digital photography using a variety of traditional and emerging techniques and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process (elements & principles of design) to deconstruct photographs and explore connections between art and society. The course enables students to explore a range of tasks, equipment, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own photographic production. Students will also make connections between various photographs in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: AWQ3M – Photography, Grade 11

Click here to open a Google Slides presentation with general information on Assumption Business Studies

Assumption_Pathway-Chart

BAF3M1: Introduction to Financial Accounting

Grade 11 University/College

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting, with emphasis on accounting procedures used in service and merchandising businesses. Students will develop an understanding of how to prepare and analyze financial statements, record business transactions using accounting software and practice their decision making in the management of a business.

Students will study and present business ethics cases and research the career of a CPA. The major project involves the selection of a company and an analysis of its annual report. Students will learn about corporate social responsibility, take on the roles of both shareholders and auditors, complete a financial analysis, track the company’s stock performance and decide whether to invest in their company.

Student opportunities include visiting the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Toronto and listening to a presentation from a Chartered Professional Accountant, participating in an accounting contest sponsored by OBEA and traveling to Toronto or Waterloo to participate in the No Limits Conference sponsored by the CPA’s of Ontario.


BAT4M1: Financial Accounting Principles

Grade 12 University/College Level

Prerequisite:  BAF3M1

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for post secondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements and how they are used in making business decisions. There will be opportunity for students to develop critical thinking skills through a thorough analysis of an annual report, allow students to apply applications to real life business cases, and encourage improvement of communication and presentation skills.


BBB4M1:International Business

Grade 12 University/College

Prerequisite:

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing an international business effectively. This course prepares students for post-secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

Students are able to participate in experiential learning by visiting Western’s Ivey School of Business and completing a case study with an Ivey Professor. Students have the opportunity to build an international trade manual for a country of their choice and conduct an international trade show.


BBI2O1: Introduction to Business>

Students enrolled in BBI2O1 will have the opportunity to gain knowledge in all facets of business. Students will learn concepts in Marketing, International Business, Human Resource Management, Personal Finance, Accounting, Investment Management, and Entrepreneurship. As a result, students will be better able to decide which course to enroll for in Grade 11 and 12.

The course consists of hands-on projects including creating a business plan for your small business, advertisements, commercials, as well as designing your own cereal box and brand. Students will learn to use programs such as Adobe Illustrator to create logos, Microsoft Publisher to create business cards, Excel to create financial statements, PowerPoint to create presentations, and Word for report writing. Students will also have an opportunity to participate in the Nipissing University Stock Market Challenge, where they will compete with high school students across Canada while managing their investment portfolio.


BDI3C1: Entrepreneurship: The Venture

Grade 11 College Level

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces students to the concept of entrepreneurship. They will determine what common characteristic entrepreneurs have and what it takes to be successful. In addition, they will explore their own characteristics in order to determine if they fit into the entrepreneurial or entrepreneurial model. Each of these will be highlighted and the benefits shall be explained and encouraged.

They will be given some latitude in choosing a possible opportunity in their local community. Once they have selected a viable opportunity they will develop a business from the initial introduction phase including a venture plan.

The course has been developed to increase the student’s research skills and ultimately help them explore possible pathways to success.


BDV4U1: Venture Planning in an Electronic Age

Grade 12 College Level

Prerequisite: None

This course will focus on the development of a professional venture plan with specific focus on an e-commerce opportunity. In making the plan, they will consider available resources, analyse the potential market base, identify legal requirements, available financing, identify the management skills and technology that would be required in carrying out their plan.

The students will be encouraged to tailor the e-commerce venture to a realistic opportunity. We stress the fact the age has no bearing on success in the 21st Century. We will introduce examples of young entrepreneurs who have taken a calculated, measured risk and succeeded in business. It is our goal to encourage students to explore their pathways for success.


BOH4M1: Business Leadership

Grade 12 University/College

Prerequisites:

The Business Leadership course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in today’s innovative world.  Students will analyze the role of a leader with a focus on decision making, problem solving, management of group dynamics, and thinking at deeper levels. The class plans, markets, and runs a school wide event with proceeds going to a charity of their choice.

By acting as real consultants to today’s issues, students are able to gain valuable experience managing goals, teams, stress, conflict, and motivation while gaining effective business communication skills through the strategic use of technology, ethics and social responsibility.


BMI3C1: Introduction to Marketing

Grade 11 College Level

Prerequisite: None

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, social media and information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, develop marketing strategies, and develop a marketing plan for a product.

Students have the opportunity to practice the skills they are learning. For example, students conduct their own taste test; from product research, display, event and recommendations to their selected companies. We have had the experience of attending business competitions, speaking to retail management at Vaughan Mills Mall and promoting events initiated by the Assumption Community.

Why take Marketing?

There are several important reasons to study marketing. Marketing plays an important role in society. It is important to businesses, it offers many career opportunities, and marketing affects your life every day! By developing a better understanding of marketing, you will also become a better informed consumer.

  • This Course counts as one credit toward the Business Certificate.

BTT1O1: Information and Communication Technology in Business

This hands-on course is delivered entirely online and introduces students to the use of information technology in a business environment. It will allow students the opportunity to explore many different software programs available to them that will be beneficial throughout secondary and post-secondary studies.   Students will collaborate with others planning events using web-based documents such as Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides. If enrolled in this course, students will also develop their own business idea, create a logo/brand using Adobe Illustrator and design a website for their business using Google Sites. Microsoft office products such as Word, Excel, & PowerPoint will also be utilized extensively for report writing, creating financial statements, and delivering efficient and concise presentations. Overall, the course will allow students to be better informed of the information and communication technology available in a business environment, and will allow them to build a foundation of digital skills necessary for success in a technologically driven society.


CIA4U1: Analyzing Current Economic Issues

Grade 12 University

Prerequisite:

This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will have the opportunity to investigate and develop informed opinions about current worldwide economic issues and be able to present their positions through a variety of forums such as debates, presentations, and multi-media presentations.


CIE3M1: The Individual and the Economy

Grade 11 College/University

Prerequisite:  None

This course explores issues and challenges facing the Canadian economy. Students will explore the economic role of firms, workers, and government as well as their own role as individual consumers and contributors. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing current economic issues faced by Canadians today, and be able to investigate and challenge decisions made at the individual, regional, and national level.


GLC2O1: Careers

Grade 10 Open

Prerequisite:  None

The department is made up of three disciplines: Geography, History, and Law.  Our teachers are committed to developing a program that improves critical thinking, is meaningful to todays learner, and builds on each learners strengths while also improving the skills they need to for success.

Advanced Placement in Geography and History

What It Takes to Take AP

You’re already using the skills it takes to succeed; AP challenges you to take them to new levels.

Students looking to enrol in Advanced Placement Geography or History need to have an interest in learning, enjoy solving problems and be looking for a more challenging learning environment. The AP student does not have to be at the top of their class but needs to have the good work habits and desire to be successful.

Work Towards University Success and Stand Out to Admissions

Our students have scored above the global, national, and provincial average and 97% of our students have been successful on their AP Human Geography and World History Exams.

A number of Assumption students have used the Advanced Placement pathway to earn University credit while enrolled in high-school; many as grade 11 students. Even though our students are successful it is not the only reason to consider the AP pathway as it helps students to prepare for a university environment and lets elite universities know you are prepared to succeed when you enter their institution.


Geography

CGF3M: Forces of Nature: Physical Processes and Disasters, Grade 11 (University/College Preparation)

In this course, students will investigate how these the earth’s physical processes shape the planet’s natural characteristics and affect human systems. Student inquiry will surround natural disasters particularly the following questions: How are humans/human action involved in the creation of natural disasters? How do humans/human action influence the impacts of human disasters. Throughout the course, students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process and use spatial technologies to analyse these processes, make predictions related to natural disasters, and assess ways of responding to them.


CGU4M: World Geography: Urban Patterns and Population Issues, Grade 12 (University/College Preparation)

The world’s population is growing, it is moving and intermixing, and it is increasingly becoming urban. This course explores these changes and the challenges that come with them. It investigates the forces that are shaping the world’s communities, the patterns of interaction between them, the quality of life within them, and their impact on the world around them. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking, the geographic inquiry process, and spatial skills and technologies as they investigate issues related to population change and urban life and propose ways of enhancing the sustainability of communities around the world.


CGW4UA: World Issues: A Geographic Analysis Grade 12 (Advanced Placement)

The Advanced Placement course in geography gives high-ability students the opportunity to earn university credit in Human Geography while attending Assumption. More importantly, the content of an AP Geography course helps students develop critical thinking skills through the understanding, application and analysis of the fundamental concepts of geography. Through AP Geography, students are introduced to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to analyze human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students will meet the five college-level goals as determined by the National Geographic Standards. They also learn the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.

*Note many students in the advanced placement pathway enroll in this course as a grade 11.


Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9 (Academic, Applied and Advanced Placement)

The grade nine course is a survey course in geography that outlines the Urban, Physical, Economic and Demographic fields of study within the greater discipline of Geography. Students will investigate topics using the geographic inquiry method that allows them to understand the spatial nature of complex issues facing Canada today. Student questions drive the inquiry process and have included: Environmental impact of purchasing a Big Mac, Accepting refugees form Syria, Evaluating a proposed apartment complex in Burlington, The economic impact of free trade.


History

Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10

The grade ten course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.


CHA3U: American History, Grade 11 (University Preparation)

This course explores key aspects of the social, economic, and political development of the United States from pre-contact to the present. Students will examine the contributions of groups and individuals to the country’s evolution and will explore the historical context of key issues, trends, and events that have had an impact on the United States, its identity and culture, and its role in the global community. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating various forces that helped shape American history.


CHW3M: World History to the End of the Fifteenth Century, Grade 11 (University/College Preparation)

This course explores the history of various societies and civilizations around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will investigate a range of factors that contributed to the rise, success, and decline of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world and will examine life in and the cultural and political legacy of these societies. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political, and economic structures and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras.


CHY4U: World History since the Fifteenth Century, Grade 12 (University/Advanced Placement)

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and ideas and assess societal progress or decline in world history.


Law

CLN4U: Canadian and International Law, Grade 12 (University Preparation)

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law and of issues related to human rights and freedoms, conflict resolution, and criminal, environmental, and workplace law, both in Canada and internationally. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process, and will develop legal reasoning skills, when investigating these and other issues in both Canadian and international contexts.


CLU3M: Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11 (University/College Preparation)

This course explores Canadian law, with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to the lives of people in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of laws relating to rights and freedoms in Canada; our legal system; and family, contract, employment, tort, and criminal law. Students will develop legal reasoning skills and will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process when investigating a range of legal issues and formulating and communicating informed opinions about them.


Civics and Citizenship, Grade 10

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

Watch and listen to our coop students as they share their coop experiences

Information Presentation

Pathways Presentation

Click here to view the Google Slides presentation

The courses in our department are designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills (as outlined in the Ontario Curriculum Expectations) that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication.

Principals Underlying the English Curriculum

The English curriculum is based on the belief that language learning is critical to responsible and productive citizenship, and that all students can become successful language learners.

The curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills that they need to achieve this goal. It aims to help students become successful language learners.

Successful language learners:

  • understand that language learning is a necessary, life-enhancing, reflective process;
  • communicate – that is, read, listen, view, speak, write, and represent – effectively and with confidence;
  • make meaningful connections between themselves, what they encounter in texts, and the world around them;
  • think critically;
  • understand that all texts advance a particular point of view that must be recognized, questioned, assessed, and evaluated;
  • appreciate the cultural impact and aesthetic power of texts;
  • use language to interact and connect with individuals and communities, for personal growth, and for active participation as world citizens.

Pre-AP English Course Perspective

Among the most popular AP courses, AP English Literature challenges students to read and interpret a wide range of imaginative works. The AP and Pre-AP courses invite students to explore a variety of genres and literary periods and to write clearly about the literature they encounter. On a daily basis, it asks them to read critically, think clearly, and write concisely. By the end of the course, students have cultivated a rich understanding of literary works and acquired a set of analytical skills they will use throughout their lives.

What makes Pre-AP English different from other high school English courses is its additional focus on rhetoric. In promoting writing in many contexts for a variety of purposes, the Pre-AP English course is the place where nonfiction texts and contexts take on an increased roll in the curriculum. Here students think deeply about language as a persuasive tool and about the dynamic relationship of writer, context, audience, and argument.

Characteristics of Academic and Applied English Learners

Academic and applied courses set high expectations for all students. Academic and applied courses differ in the balance between essential concepts and additional material, and in the balance between theory and application.

ACADEMIC

APPLIED

Loves to read Finds reading challenging
Enjoys writing Writing is not enjoyable
Self-driven Needs direction
Mark in Grade 8 English is 65% or higher Mark in Grade 8 English is lower than 65%
Fairly proficient with spelling and grammar Weak spelling and grammar
Consistently completes homework Homework completion is inconsistent
Prefers reading fictional texts, such as novels, plays, etc. Prefers reading non-fiction texts such as websites, magazines, newspapers, etc.

ACADEMIC ENGLISH

APPLIED ENGLISH

Analyze information, ideas and elements to make inferences Describe information, ideas, opinions and themes
Locate and evaluate information and ideas from sources Locate and record information and ideas from sources
Select narrative style and appropriate level of language to suit the form, audience and purpose of the work Identify the specific audience for each piece of writing

 


Advanced Placement English

Pre-AP English Course Perspective

Among the most popular AP courses, AP English Literature challenges students to read and interpret a wide range of imaginative works. The AP and Pre-AP courses invite students to explore a variety of genres and literary periods and to write clearly about the literature they encounter. On a daily basis, it asks them to read critically, think clearly, and write concisely. By the end of the course, students have cultivated a rich understanding of literary works and acquired a set of analytical skills they will use throughout their lives.

A Focus on Rhetoric

What makes Pre-AP English different from other high school English courses is its additional focus on rhetoric. In promoting writing in many contexts for a variety of purposes, the Pre-AP English course is the place where nonfiction texts and contexts take on an increased roll in the curriculum. Here students think deeply about language as a persuasive tool and about the dynamic relationship of writer, context, audience, and argument.

Reading and Writing from a Different Perspective

Pre-AP students need to adjust their perspective and build on their Critical Thinking skills/techniques when they take on the course. When we talk about familiar techniques of diction, syntax, imagery, and tone, we need to help students see how persuasive writers marshal these devises to the service of argument. When we talk about audience, we need to get students thinking about particular audiences and specific contexts for writing, rather than presuming a general audience as we usually do for literature.

This “finding of the argument” and “making of their own arguments” is often new for students, so the Pre-AP English course is designed to allow them time for reading, thinking, and writing. Reading time allows them to begin to recognize the various shapes and parts of an argument. Thinking time helps them explore issues, think about logical reasoning, and begin to understand appeals and rhetorical modes. Writing time provides them with the opportunity to work through the process of creating an argument.

There is neither a required reading list nor a required textbook for AP/Pre-AP English. Teachers are encouraged to select works of literary merit culled from a variety of genres and periods from the 16th century to the present. While students should have exposure to a variety of works, it is also important to make sure they get to know several works of literary merit in depth; this usually begins with roughly 5 pieces in Grade 9 and expanding to 7 for the Grade 12 AP course (includes summer reading list expectations).

Students will also devote a substantial portion of the class to poetry; not only can it be wonderfully rewarding to both teacher and students, but it can also be very useful test preparation: nearly half of the AP Exam includes questions about verse.

Who Should Take AP Literature, and Why?

It is important to recognize the power of an AP English class to challenge a wide range of students; however, the most important skill set necessary for Pre-AP English success is a strong motivation and the desire to work hard, as once a skill has been taught the students are expected to implement it independently. In addition, with an augmented reading list Pre-AP English students must be individually motivated to read and must not require coaxing from the teacher or parents to do so. Any apprehension by the students to complete the required readings on the structured timelines will result in them quickly being left behind.

All students who want to strengthen their analytical thinking, reading, and writing skills belong in Pre-AP English.


English Course Descriptions

ENG1D1 Academic 9 English

This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG1DA Academic 9 English Pre-AP English

This course is designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety
of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 academic English course, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG1L1 Locally Developed 9 English

This course provides foundational literacy and communication skills to prepare students for success in their daily lives, in the workplace, in the Grade 11 English Workplace Preparation course. The course is organized by strands that develop listening and talking skills, reading and viewing skills, and writing skills. In all strands, the focus is on developing foundational literacy skills and on using language clearly and accurately in a variety of authentic contexts. Students develop strategies and put into practice the processes involved in talking,
listening, reading, viewing, writing, and thinking, and reflect regularly upon their growth in these areas. LDCC English learning expectations challenge students to examine their
conceptual understandings, develop and enhance their critical-thinking skills, and engage in meaningful dialogue.

ENG1P1 Applied 9 English

This course is designed to develop the key oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will read, interpret, and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on identifying and using appropriate strategies and processes to improve students’ comprehension of texts and to help them communicate clearly and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 applied English course, which leads to college or
workplace preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG2D1 Academic 10 English

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 1l university or college preparation course. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG2DA Academic 10 English

This is a Pre-AP course. This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 1l university or college preparation course. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic
to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG2L1 Locally Developed 10 English

In this course, students focus on extending their literacy and communication skills to prepare for success in their daily lives, in the workplace, in the English, Grade 11, Workplace Preparation course. The course is organized by strands that extend listening and talking skills, reading and viewing skills, and writing skills. In all strands, the focus is on refining foundational literacy skills and on using language clearly and accurately in a variety of authentic contexts. Students build on their strategies and engage in the processes involved in talking, listening, readingviewing, writing, and thinking. Students reflect regularly upon their growth in these areas. LDCC English learning expectations challenge students to examine their
conceptual understandings, develop and enhance their critical-thinking skills, and engage in meaningful dialogue.

ENG2P1 Applied 10 English

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparation course. Students considering moving from one
destination to another (e.g., applied to academic; academic to applied) are strongly encouraged to take a summer school course to encourage success in the transition.

ENG3C1 College 11 English

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will study the content, form, and style of a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and other countries, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 college
preparation course. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course. Students who have successfully completed ENG2D may also select this course.

ENG3E1 Workplace 11 English

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in the workplace and in daily life. Students will study the content, form, and style of a variety of contemporary informational, graphic, and literary texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical purposes. An important focus will be on using language clearly and accurately in a variety of formal and informal contexts. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 workplace
preparation course. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course. Students who have successfully completed ENG2L may also select this course.

ENG3U1 University 11 English

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course.

ENG3UA University 11 English

This is a pre-AP English course. This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

ENG4C1 College 12 English

This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life Students will analyse a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from various countries and cultures, eate oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for college or the
workplace. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course. Students who have successfully completed ENG3U may also select this course.

ENG4E1 Workplace 12 English

This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in the workplace and in daily life. Students will analyse informational, graphic, and literary texts and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for workplace-related and practical purposes. An important focus will be on using language accurately and organizing ideas and information coherently. The course is intended to prepare students for the workplace and active citizenship. Students considering moving from one
destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course. Students who have successfully completed ENG3C or ENG3U may also select this course.

ENG4U1 University 12 English

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace. Students considering moving from one destination to another (e.g., college to university; workplace to college) must successfully complete a transfer course.

ENG4UA University 12 English

This is the Gr.12 AP English course. This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral,
written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace. The ENG3UA course is a prerequisite.

Beginning Communication in English ESLAO1 Open 9 English

This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce the English language and help students adjust to their new cultural environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday and essential academic purposes; use basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns in short conversations; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.

English in Daily Life ESLBO1 Open 9 English

This course builds on students’ previous education and language knowledge to introduce the English language and help students adjust to their new cultural environment. Students will use beginning English language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for everyday and essential academic purposes; use basic English language structures and simple sentence patterns in short conversations; read short adapted texts; and write phrases and short sentences. The course also provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to begin to adapt to their new lives in Canada.

English for School and Work ESLCO1 Open 9 English

This course extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of forms of text. Students will also expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate the transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian
issues.

Study Skills in English ESLDO1 Open 9 English

This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the reading, writing, and oral presentation skills required for success in all school subjects. They will study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to various print and media texts.

The Writer’s Craft EWC4U1 University 12 English

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyse models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

By studying a second language, students learn a great deal about interacting effectively with others, because they have to focus closely on what it is they are trying to communicate; what they need others to understand, and why; how their oral or written expression is received and interpreted; and what others are trying to communicate to them, and why. As they learn to exchange information and ideas in another language, they also learn about other ways of thinking, other ways of doing things, and other ways of living – in short, about other people and other cultures.

The FSL curriculum emphasizes communicating a message by using knowledge of vocabulary, language conventions, and grammar while taking into consideration the purpose, the audience, and the situation or context. This focus on the sociolinguistic and cultural aspects of language allows students to apply their language knowledge in a variety of real-world situations and contexts.

Through the study of French, students experience multiple opportunities to communicate for authentic purposes in real-life situations. These opportunities enable students to build on and apply their knowledge of French in everyday academic and social situations, thus developing effective communication skills. Students can take control of their learning through observation, listening, and rehearsing with others; refining their use of language; and making thoughtful and meaningful connections to the world around them. If students see aspects of the FSL curriculum modelled and reinforced by educators, family members, and community members, their learning is reinforced and validated as more relevant to their lives.

The FSL curriculum strives, ultimately, to foster an interest in language learning that continues not only during a student’s time in school but later in life.

Core French

FSF1 D1 Academic 9 Français

This course emphasizes the further development of oral communication, reading, and writing skills. Students will build on and apply their knowledge of French while exploring a variety of themes, such as relationships, social trends, and careers. Thematic readings, which include a selection of short stories, articles, and poems, will serve as stepping stones to oral and written activities.

FSF1P1 Applied 9 Français

This course emphasizes the concurrent development of oral communication, reading, and writing skills, using a broad-based theme such as theedia. Students will enhance their ability to understand and speak French
through conversations, discussions, and presentations. They will also read short stories, articles, poems, and
songs, and write brief descriptions, letters, dialogues, and invitations.

FSF2D1 Academic 10 Français

This course enables students to increase their knowledge of the French language, further develop their language skills, and deepen their understanding and appreciation of francophone culture around the world. Exploring a variety of themes, students will develop and apply critical thinking skills in discussion, in their analysis and interpretation of texts, and in their own writing.

FSF3U1 University 11 Français

This course draws on a variety of themes to promote extensive development of reading and writing skills and to reinforce oral communication skills. Students will gain a greater understanding of French-speaking cultures in Canada and around the world through their reading of a variety of materials, including a short novel or a play. Students will produce various written assignments, including a formal essay. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions in both spoken and written French will be emphasized throughout the course.

FSF4U1 University 12 Français

This course draws on a variety of themes to promote extensive development of French language skills. Students will consolidate their oral skills as they discuss literature, culture, and current issues. They will read a variety of texts and will write a formal essay. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions in both spoken and written French will be emphasized throughout the course.


AP French Language and Culture

Course Overview

The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP French Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in French.

The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

What makes this course interesting?

  • Learn about contemporary Francophone societies and cultures by examining their products, practices and perspectives through thematic study
  • Use authentic sources such as newspaper and magazine articles, websites, films, music, video clips, blogs, podcasts, stories, and literary excerpts in
  • French to develop language skills and communicative proficiency in real life settings
  • Build communication skills through regular class discussion, one-on-one conversation, collaboration with classmates, role plays, email responses, essay and journal writing, and oral presentations
  • Develop your French language proficiency through the exploration of a variety of interdisciplinary themes that tie closely to French culture.

Phys-Ed uniforms are available for purchase for all students through School Cash Online.

It is a course requirement for Grade 9 and 10 students taking an HPE course to purchase a uniform (t-shirt + shorts and/or capris). Please see Mrs. Kuzmar in the Phys-Ed office on your lunch or after school to pick up your uniform with proof of purchase (screen shot of invoice).


Athletic Council

Our athletic council strives to provide an inclusive atmosphere where we promote the many athletic endeavours we offer here at Assumption. The athletic council is open to ALL students, the members of the council DO NOT need to play on a sport. The members of the council may be in any grade. All we ask for is a commitment and passion for athletics and promoting a healthy lifestyle.


Camps

  • Basketball Clinics
  • Summer Sports Camp

Forms


SHSM: Fitness and Sport Leadership

Teacher Lead: Mrs Lana Fernley
Contact Phone Number: 905-634-5243
Contact email: fernleylan@hcdsb.org

Certification: Conflict Resolution / Group Dynamics
Location: YMCA Cedar Glen Outdoor Education Centre, Schomberg, ON.


Mathematics Department Teachers

Mrs. Albert
Ms. Molon
Mrs. Bedford
Mr. Palermo
Mrs. Canaon
Mr. Presta
Mr. Colterman
Ms. Risi
Mr. Fricano
Mrs. Sawchuk
Mrs. Krajewski-Colterman
Mr. Soster – Department Head
Mrs. Laferriere
Mrs. Timperio

Follow The Math Department on Twitter – https://twitter.com/AssumptionMath


Math MADNESS

Every Wednesday morning 7:30am-8:15am and afternoon 2:15pm – 3:30pm in Room 212


CEMC Free Online Math Help

CEMC Math Help Information

https://courseware.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/


Math Contests

  • Thursday, November 7, 2019 – COMC (Canadian Open Mathematics Challenge) (2.5 Hours) – https://cms.math.ca/Competitions/COMC/2019/
  • Wednesday, November 20, 2019 – Canadian Senior & Intermediate Mathematics Contests (2 Hours) http://www.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/contests/csimc.html
  • Wednesday, February 12, 2020 – Canadian Computing Competition
  • Tuesday, February 25, 2020 – Pascal Contest (Grade 9), Cayley Contest (Grade 10) and Fermat Contest (grade 11) – All 1 hour
  • Tuesday, April 7, 2020 – Euclid Contest (2.5 hours)
  • Tuesday, April 7, 2020 – Canadian Team Mathematics Contest
  • Wednesday, April 15, 2020 – Fryer Contest (Grade 9), Galois Contest (Grade 10) and Hypatia Contest (Grade 11) – All 1.25 Hours

Assumption Mathematics Pathways Chart

Assumption-Mathematics-Pathways-Chart

On-Line Extra Math Help – TVO Mathify

(for Grade 9 and 10 students)

Please visit https://tvomathify.com/register/student. Note, students will need their OEN number to register.

Grade 9 EQAO Practice Tests

EQAO Sample Practice Tests


Advanced Placement Math

To learn more about AP Math, view our AP section here.

In an address to Catholic students, Pope Francis said that students in Catholic schools need to learn three languages: the language of the head, heart and hands – To know, love and to do.  The Catholic approach to education is a holistic one where the entire person is educated. A quality education extends past skills acquisition and vocational training and seeks to form the entire person by striving to nourish all the gifts God has given a particular student. This is what we endeavour to do here at Assumption Catholic Secondary School.

In addition to a dynamic selection of religion courses, our school offers a wide variety of courses in the social sciences and humanities. Courses such as philosophy, anthropology, psychology, sociology, family studies, food and culture allow students to develop a deeper appreciation of the human person, the family and Canada’s diverse multi-cultural society.

An integral part of a Catholic school is its religion program. Not only is the Catholic faith infused into all classes and activities of our school, but the focused study of religion is a rich opportunity for students to explore matters of faith, morality and service. Our religious studies classes are designed to provide a lively and engaging opportunity for students to grow in their Catholic faith and to mature in both ethics and virtue. Our religious studies courses also provides opportunities to learn about other world religions and service to the community. Our chaplaincy leader Ms. Taylor also works with the religion department to provide opportunities for prayer, reception of the Sacraments and to attend class retreats.

We consider it both an honour and privilege to journey with your students as they grow into the young adults God has created them to be. God Bless.

“A disciple is not above his teacher, nor a servant above his master.” – Matthew 10:24

Focus on Faith Prayer

The following prayer was written by staff in support of the new theological theme

Who Do You Say That I Am?:

Jesus, Friend and Teacher,
You ask us,
“Who do you say that I am?”

Thank you for inviting us
To know you more each day.
Quiet our minds
To hear your Word;

Open our hearts
To love you more;

For the more we know you,
The more brightly we reflect you.

You meet us in our every need,
Your love, new each day!

Guide us as we build your kingdom,
And find our home in you;
For you are the Lord,
The face of God,
And the breath of the Holy Spirit.

Amen.


About the Courses

Religion

At Assumption, our hope is to help students discover the religious ideas expressed in our Catholic world view. Our curriculum encourages students to continue to build loving relationships and to recognize their call to live an ethical life guided by the Gospel principles of equity, dignity and respect for all of God’s creations.

All Religion courses offered at Assumption reflect the expectations outlined by the Institute for Catholic Education and its 2006 Religious Education Policy Document. Courses in grades 9 through 12 are supported with textbooks and resources provided by our Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Social Sciences / Humanities

We offer various courses that explore concepts and issues in the areas of Social Sciences and Humanities. Students will gain insights on topics that concern human interactions, decision-making and behaviours from various perspectives. As they develop valuable critical thinking and research skills, students will analyse how current issues impact our 21st Century world and how Canadians are meeting the challenges of the ever-changing global environment.


Religion/Social Science/Humanities Courses Offered at Assumption

Religion

HRE10 – Be With Me

This course invites students to a deeper understanding of both the joy and the demands of following in the way of Christ and living out the call to discipleship as it is described in the Scriptures. Using the Beatitudes as a touchstone, students examine the attitudes and actions that characterize the Christian life. Students will explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, interpersonal relationships and sexuality. They are encouraged to understand and nurture within themselves the virtues which will enable them to deepen their relationship with God in and through Christ in the context of a Spirit filled community.

HRE20 – Christ and Culture

This course examines the relationship between the person and message of Christ and the dominant attitudes of contemporary culture. Central to this course is the sacramental nature of Jesus and through His incarnation, the sacramentality of the Catholic Church, persons, and all of creation. Beginning with students’ own life experiences, seen in light of the Gospel narratives, students acquire a deeper and more systematic knowledge of Christ, his message, and his Church. Connections between the Church and contemporary culture are explored in terms of what it means to be a responsible adolescent developing as a member of a Catholic, Christian community while living within the context of a secular society. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of person-hood, interpersonal relationships, and sexuality. Students have the opportunity to experience first-hand the call and response to Christian Community Service.

HRT3M – World Religions (Mixed)

World Religions introduces students to the various expressions and responses to humanity’s encounter with mystery in our quest for life’s meaning. The course explores the life wisdom found in the responses of the major faith traditions to the compelling questions concerning the spiritual dimension of human experience, self-understanding, and the role of the individual within the family. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, family relationships, and sexuality.

HRF30 – World Religions (Open)

This course introduces students to the range and diversity of world religions, and examines how systems of belief affect individual lives and social relationships. Students learn about a variety of religious beliefs, teachings, traditions, and practices. Through this discovery students develop their awareness of the place of religion in the lives of their neighbours as well as a more authentic understanding and a deeper commitment to their own faith tradition. This course helps break down misconceptions and prejudices regarding the other religious traditions. Students develop skills used in researching and investigating topics related to world religions. This course draws on expectations outlined in both the Social Sciences and Humanities and the Institute for Catholic Education policy document. This Open course is designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and to prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society.

HRE4M – Church and Culture (Mixed)

This course is directed toward the clear identification of Catholic moral principles and the concrete application of these principles in the lives of students. The course proceeds from foundational beliefs rooted in Sacred Scripture concerning justice and peace to an exploration of the principles that shape Christian life. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, interpersonal relationships, and sexuality. Special attention is given to the interaction between the Church and culture. The modern world is characterized by a multiplicity of values, philosophies, and ideologies. In a democratic, pluralistic society, these concepts may creatively reinforce one another or they may compete with and contradict one another. The Christian moral life is a call to follow Jesus Christ, to believe in the redemptive love ofGod for humankind and to proclaim and incarnate the reign of God as inaugurated by Jesus Christ. This course is intended to prepare the senior student for this lifelong task.

HRE40 – Church and Culture (Open)

This course assists students in their development of the skills and knowledge necessary to live lives of full maturity. Within the Catholic faith tradition it is believed that this growth towards human maturity is best served when students are able to define themselves authentically in relation to their God, to other people and to their world. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, interpersonal relationships, and sexuality. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of the prophetic tradition in Scripture, become familiar with the social teachings of the Catholic Church, explore contemporary notions of spirituality and prayer, and recognize the importance, power and potential of the human person in relation to morality and personal choices concerning future life paths.

HZT4U – Philosophy

This course enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, aesthetics). Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. They will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.


Social Science

HFN10 – Food and Nutrition

This course explores the factors that affect attitudes and decisions about food, examines current issues of body image and food marketing, and is grounded in the scientific study of nutrition. Students will learn how to make informed food choices and how o prepare foods, and will investigate our Canadian food heritage and food industries, as well as global food issues. This course also introduces students to research skills related to food and nutrition.

HSP3U – Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology

This course provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science research, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

HSB4U – Challenge and Change in Society

This course focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will critically analyze how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use those ideas to analyze causes of and responses to challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities. Students will explore ways in which social science research methods can be used to study social change.

HHS4U – Families in Canada

This course enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyse the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

Ontario’s Catholic education system is not a duplicate of other school systems. While it adheres to Ministry of Education requirements, it does so from a Catholic perspective. (OCSTA & OECTA & The Catholic Dioceses of Ontario, ©2009)


Teacher List

  • E. Adolphe
  • S. Cabrera Yero
  • A. Cino
  • T. D`Orsay
  • D. Gatza
  • N. Kuzmar
  • J. Horne
  • J. Persin-Mijic
  • S. Ponikvar
  • J. Riley
  • M. Walsh (Department Head)
  • C. Worbec

Assumptions Science department has been delivering quality curriculum based education to our community for over 30 years, and we continually strive to improve on that legacy.

Our dedicated teachers are happy to help with any questions or issues that you may have.  Please do not hesitate to contact any of us should the need arise.

The Overall Goals of the Ontario Science Program

Achievement of both excellence and equity underlies the three major goals of the secondary science program.  The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 through 12, therefore outlines  not only the skills and knowledge that students are expected to develop but also the attitudes that they will need to develop in order to use their knowledge and skills responsibly. The three goals of the science program are as follows:

  • to understand the basic concepts of science
  • to develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required for scientific inquiry
  • to relate science to technology, society, and the environment

Ministry of Education, The Ontario Curriculum, 2008

View the Science Pathways – not sure what courses are offered, or which level to take next. (Refer to pg.13)

Department Staff

  • Ms. Bak
  • Mrs. Camacho
  • Mr. Colterman
  • Mrs. D’Orsay
  • Mr. Presta
  • Mr. Rousselle (Dept. Head)
  • Ms. Sobcyzk
  • Ms. Urban
  • Mrs. VanLandschoot

Advanced Placement Science

What is Advanced Placement?

Advanced Placement (AP) is a program created by the College Board, which offers College/University level curriculum to high school students. Colleges and Universities may grant course credit to students who obtain high scores on the AP examinations depending on individual school/program requirements, however, the AP exams are not mandatory or required to obtain the AP course credit.

AP courses are taught by highly qualified and/or trained teachers who use the AP course descriptions to guide them. The course descriptions outline the course content, describe the curricular goals of the subject, and provide sample exam questions. While the course descriptions are a significant source of information about the course content on which the AP exams will be based, AP teachers have the flexibility to determine how this content is presented.

What is Pre-AP?

Pre-AP exists in order to ensure that all students are provided with the requirements necessary to fulfill the AP curriculum but also the Ontario curriculum. Grades 9 through 11 are considered Pre-AP years in preparation for grade 12, which is the AP year for each subject.

Pre-AP aims to prepare every student for higher intellectual engagement by starting the development of skills and acquisition of knowledge as early as possible. It provides an opportunity to help all students acquire the knowledge, concepts, and skills needed to engage in a higher level of learning by consistently challenging students to expand their knowledge and skills to the next level.

AP Science Courses at Assumption

The Special Education Department welcomes and supports all students with a variety of exceptionalities. We believe that all students can succeed given their unique strengths and differences. Keeping the student at the centre, we are committed to ensuring that students with special education needs will learn in a supportive and inclusive environment.

FOLLOW our LIFE SKILLS students on Twitter! @AssumptionRm103 and @MrsContino

Special Education Resource Teachers

Assumption students are integrated into all aspects of the school environment. Our Special Education Resource Teachers work collaboratively with students, staff and parents in variety of ways:

  • Assisting with program accommodations and/or modifications
  • Developing individual education plans
  • Providing in-class support
  • Supporting students needs by promoting accessibility, honouring diversity and mutual respect

Individual Education Plan

Semester 2 IEPs are being updated as required. A letter asking for your input has been mailed home. Please complete, sign and return to your child’s SERT.

IPRC

If we did not receive an Option to Waive the IPRC from you Semester 1, another has been mailed home to you. Kindly complete and return to your child’s SERT.

Office 365

To enhance the learning environment for students, we are currently using Office 365 to assist our students in developing organizational and inquiry skills. Parents/guardians are encouraged to explore Office365 with their child.


GLE Learning Strategies

GLE 1O: Grade 9, Open pathway

GLE 2O: Grade 10, Open pathway

Learning Strategies – Skills for Success in Secondary School

The Learning Strategies courses focus on three interconnected strands:

  • learning skills
  • personal development
  • interpersonal relationships

Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal-management skills, and collaboration and teamwork skills. The course builds confidence, promotes self-advocacy and fosters independence. Students are encouraged to become reflective thinkers, effective communicators, and self-directed, responsible learners.

Prerequisite: Recommendation of the school Principal.

GLE3O: Grade 11, Open pathway

GLE4O: Grade 12, Open pathway

Advanced Learning Strategies – Skills for Success after Secondary School

The Advanced Learning Strategies courses focus on the skills necessary for successful transition to postsecondary education and the workforce. Students will learn to appreciate and further develop their individual strengths and transferrable skills. Students will investigate trends and resources to support their postsecondary path and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals. Through the integration of body, mind, and spirit, they will become more collaborative, caring, and responsible members of society.

Prerequisite: Recommendation of the school Principal.


Life Skills

Follow us on Twitter! @AssumptionRm103 and @MrsContino

The Assumption Life Skills classes provide students with a variety of exceptionalities a structured program with a focus on individualized programming and community integration. Our goal is for each individual student to become as independent as possible by developing and expanding his/her full potential. Our Life Skills Program emphasizes:

  • Functional Literacy and Numeracy Skills
  • Daily Living Skills
  • Social Skills
  • Employability Skills
  • Safety and Community Awareness
  • Socialization and Integration in the Community
  • Participation in a variety of activities

The students in our Life Skills class are given the opportunity to become involved in the Best Buddies Program. Best Buddies at Assumption is a program that promotes and supports an environment that allows the opportunity for one-to-one friendships and leadership development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of the program is to help students become more confident and help grow new friendships.

NOW RECRUITING!

See Ms. Quinlan in room 103 or Mrs. Contino in room 107 to join this fabulous club!


Special Education Resource Teachers (SERT)

Kathleen Berlasso
Department Head of Special Education
berlasso-stonek@hcdsb.org
extension 1051

Maria Carrescia

Special Education Resource Teacher
carresciam@hcdsb.org
extension 1011

Cynthia Contino

Special Education Teacher – Life Skills
continoc@hcdsb.org
extension 1011

Lesley Degenhardt

Special Education Resource Teacher
degenhardtl@hcdsb.org
extension 1011

Jacqueline Martens

Special Education Resource Teacher
martensj@hcdsb.org
extension 1011

Colleen Quinlan

Special Education Teacher – Life Skills
quinlanc@hcdsb.org
extension 1011

DESIGN, BUILD, CREATE AND MAINTAIN…

Technological education provides students with useful and valuable skills. These skills provide them with the tools that our technology driven world demands. From drill bits to computer bits, students will get hands-on experience with a wide variety of technical possibilities. Safe work practices are learned in all shops and on all equipment.

Technology classes provide immediate skills and prepare our students for post-secondary paths such as trades & apprenticeship, college technology programs and university fields such as engineering. Many of our graduates have gone on to successful careers because of their technical skills.

Technology programs offered at Assumption include:

  • Communication Technology
  • Computer Engineering
  • Construction Technology
  • Cosmetology
  • Computer Science
  • Hospitality

For more information about our SHSM Program – ICT SHSM

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